A look at freedom and liberty in the US ten years after 9-11-01

Posted on September 7, 2011. Filed under: constitution, President | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A recent poll revealed some surprises about how Americans feel about their constitutional rights after ten years of changes in how the Fourth Amendment has been applied in their lives. They still care a great deal about civil liberties protections, even in the face of the need to deal with increased government surveillance. They have differing levels of tolerance for intrusions however, depending on the circumstances.
Readers are encouraged to read the full WaPo article for the details of this truly fascinating poll.

Amplify’d from www.washingtonpost.com

Poll: Americans open to trading off some liberties _ within limits _ to fight terrorism

By Associated Press, Published: September 6

WASHINGTON — Surveillance cameras in public places? Sure. Body scans at airports? Maybe. Snooping in personal email? Not so fast.

Ten years after the 9/11 attacks led to amped-up government surveillance efforts, two-thirds of Americans say it’s fitting to sacrifice some privacy and freedoms in the fight against terrorism, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

A slim majority — 54 percent — say that if they had to choose between preserving their rights and freedoms and protecting people from terrorists, they’d come down on the side of civil liberties. The public is particularly protective of the privacy of U.S. citizens, voicing sharp opposition to government surveillance of Americans’ emails and phone calls.

The poll asked people to grapple with some of same quandaries that the government and the courts have been wrestling with over the past decade, and even before the 2001 terrorist attacks.

Two-thirds of those surveyed believe the resulting policies are a mish-mash created in reaction to events as they occur rather than clearly planned.

The AP-NORC poll found that about half of those surveyed felt that they have indeed lost some of their own personal freedoms to fight terrorism. Was it worth it? Close to half of those who thought they’d lost freedoms doubted it was necessary.

Overall, six in 10 say the government is doing enough to protect Americans’ rights and freedoms as it fights terrorism. But people may not even be aware of what they’ve given up. The extent of government eavesdropping and surveillance is something of a mystery.

Read more at www.washingtonpost.com

 

About these ads

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • Post categories

  • Archives

  • Nuts and Bolts

  • My Twitter

    • RT @matthewstoller: . . . whether the NSA exploited Heartbleed ...no one expects the NSA to have protected us FROM Heartbleed is telling. 1 week ago
    • Retirement from House/Senate could become epidemic. I often wonder how the good ones stay as long as they do. Will miss Rep. Dingle. 1 month ago
    • RT @WendyDavisTexas: #TeamWendy raised $2.85M in the latest reporting period, outraising our opponent & showing strong grassroots support. … 1 month ago
    • Valentines sent and received despite huge winter storm renews my faith in either obligation or true love. Which is it? 2 months ago
    • RT @washingtonpost: Ron Paul starts petition for Sonwden clemency wapo.st/Mj8e3D 2 months ago
  • del.icio.us

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: